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Warren Commission Hearings: Vol. VII - Page 137« Previous | Next »

(Testimony of Elmer L. Boyd)

Mr. Ball.
you and you can read it over and correct it and sign it if you wish. That's one procedure you can follow.
Or, this young lady will write it up and we'll send it on to the Commission as it is if you waive your signature. You have your option---you can do either one.
Mr. Boyd.
I think she probably got it down all right---I'll trust her.
Mr. Ball.
Then, you are waiving your signature?
Mr. Boyd.
Yes, sir.
Mr. Ball.
Thank you very much, and I am glad to have met you.
Mr. Boyd.
Glad to have met you, Mr. Ball.

-----------------------
Robert Lee Studebaker

Testimony of Robert Studebaker Lee

The testimony of Robert Lee Studebaker was taken at 3:45 p.m., on April 6, 1964, in the office of the U.S. attorney, 301 Post Office Building, Bryan and Ervay Streets, Dallas, Tex., by Messrs. Joseph A. Ball, John Hart Ely, and Samuel A. Stern, assistant counsel of the President's Commission, Dr. Alfred Goldberg, historian, was present.
Mr. Ball.
Do you solemnly swear the testimony you give before this Commission to be the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth, so help you God?
Mr. Studebaker.
Yes, sir.
Mr. Ball.
Will you state your name, please?
Mr. Studebaker.
R. L. Studebaker---Robert Lee.
Mr. Ball.
And you have been requested to appear here to give testimony in this inquiry, have you not, by your Chief of Police, who told you that we had a matter requiring your testimony?
Mr. Studebaker.
Yes.
Mr. Ball.
The subject of the testimony is the assassination of President Kennedy.
You made certain investigations on November 22 and 23 and 24 with respect to that, did you not?
Mr. Studebaker.
Yes, sir.
Mr. Ball.
What I want to ask you is what you did at that time. Can you tell me something about yourself, where you were born, where you went to school, and what your training is?
Mr. Studebaker.
I was born in Niles, Mich., and attended several schools and have been in Dallas and I have been in the Air Force and came to Dallas in 1950, and have been in the Police Department since February 8, 1954, and right now I am a detective in the Crime Scene Service Section of the ID Bureau of the Dallas Police Department.
Mr. Ball.
What sort of training did you have for the crime lab work that you are doing?
Mr. Studebaker.
It's just on-the-job training---you go out with old officers and learn how to dust for prints and take pictures and fingerprints.
Mr. Ball.
Have you had any special training in identification fingerprints?
Mr. Studebaker.
No, sir; we don't classify prints too much where we are. We Just compare them.
Mr. Ball.
What is the technique of lifting a print, as you call it?
Mr. Studebaker.
Well, it's just using the regular dusting powder that we have and if you find something that you want to dust, you dust for the print. We used on this special case up there on those boxes and things, we have a special powder that we used on that.
Mr. Ball.
Then you take a picture of the print--a photograph?
Mr. Studebaker.
Of this area, we just taped it to preserve it. We just lift the print and then tape it to preserve it.
Mr. Ball.
By "lifting a print," you mean to make it stand out?
Mr. Studebaker.
Raising it up; yes, sir.
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