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Warren Commission Hearings: Vol. VII - Page 538« Previous | Next »

(Testimony of Joe Marshall Smith)

Mr. Liebeler.
I don't think it is of any particular importance if you can't recall. What did you do after you were finally relieved?
Mr. Smith.
I don't know if this is of significance either, but they had set up, the Salvation Army had some coffee and I had a cup of coffee and proceeded on back to the Mercantile Bank. I had an extra job there that evening.
Mr. Liebeler.
You were relieved from your duty post?
Mr. Smith.
Yes, sir.
Mr. Liebeler.
And went on about your own personal affairs?
Mr. Smith.
Yes, sir.
Mr. Liebeler.
Did you conduct any additional investigation or have to do with the investigation of the assassination after that?
Mr. Smith.
No, sir.
Mr. Liebeler.
Did you know Officer Tippit?
Mr. Smith.
Remotely. I didn't know him real well. Just knew him when I saw him.
Mr. Liebeler.
When did you first hear about Oswald's capture?
Mr. Smith.
It was after I left my post.
Mr. Liebeler.
After you left your post?
Mr. Smith.
Yes; in fact, just before I got off from working at the bank. Just before 6 o'clock. A squad of detectives, I don't recall their names, but they told me they got a man over at the Texas Theatre that they thought might have been the one.
Mr. Liebeler.
After you heard the shots and went from point 4 on Commission Exhibit No. 354 down to point 5 searching the bushy area here, did you have any occasion to look up in the windows of any of the buildings surrounding the intersection of Elm and Houston Streets?
Mr. Smith.
No, sir; I was--pardon the expression--beating the bushes and checking the cars.
Mr. Smith.
No sir.
Mr. Liebeler.
Are you familiar with the traffic patterns on these three streets here, Commerce, Main, and Elm Streets, as they go down under the triple underpass?
Mr. Smith.
Yes sir.
Mr. Liebeler.
The motorcade came down Main Street from the east to intersection of Main Street and Houston, did it not?
Mr. Smith.
Yes; headed west on Main.
Mr. Liebeler.
Yes; and it turned right on Houston Street and then turned left on Elm and was headed toward the triple underpass when the assassination occurred. What would have prevented the motorcade from going directly down Main Street under the triple underpass, remembering now that the motorcade wanted to go onto Stemmons Freeway?
Mr. Smith.
I don't know, sir.
Mr. Liebeler.
Now, could you have gone straight down Main Street and gotten onto Stemmons Freeway down here?
Mr. Smith.
Yes, sir.
Mr. Liebeler.
Where the three streets go under the triple overpass, there is a concrete barrier between Elm Street and Main Street; is there not?
Mr. Smith.
What do you mean?
Mr. Liebeler.
Where the streets actually go under the railroad tracks here.
Mr. Smith.
Yes, sir.
Mr. Libeler.
Now where is the entrance as we go off, as we see the three streets going off the picture here, Commission Exhibit No. 354? Where is the entrance to the Stemmons Freeway?
Mr. Smith.
It is back off.
Mr. Liebeler.
It is not shown on the picture?
Mr. Smith.
No, sir; it is back off here.
Mr. Liebeler.
To go down Stemmons Expressway or Freeway towards the trade mart, you would have to turn how? Would you turn to your right?
Mr. Smith.
Yes, sir.
Mr. Liebeler.
Now could you have actually gone off to the right and crossed
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