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Warren Commission Hearings: Vol. VII - Page 289« Previous | Next »

(Testimony of J. B. Hicks)

Mr. Hicks.
just back and forth if someone had asked did we get a picture of this and picture of that; well, I can't recall any other particular item that I might have done.
Mr. Ball.
Were you present when Oswald was arraigned in the identification bureau?
Mr. Hicks.
No, sir; I left just a few minutes before that, I understand.
Mr. Ball.
What time did you leave; do you know?
Mr. Hicks.
I left it was shortly after 2. I don't know the exact time, maybe 2:15.
Mr. Ball.
You think he was arraigned after you left?
Mr. Hicks.
I am rather certain that he was because I believe I would have known about it had he been arraigned before I left because there is only one door in our office to go out and had any other group been there, I would have noticed it, I believe.
Mr. Ball.
Did you talk to Oswald any?
Mr. Hicks.
I only asked him his name when I made his fingerprints and I did not question him or go to any details on talking to him.
Mr. Ball.
You were not present at any showups of Oswald?
Mr. Hicks.
No, sir.
Mr. Ball.
Did you make any fingerprint study in this case or palmprint study?
Mr. Hicks.
No, sir--any comparisons to the prints that we had?
Mr. Ball.
Yes.
Mr. Hicks.
No, sir; I did not.
Mr. Ball.
You did not compare the prints you took of Oswald with any specimen that might have been taken from the Texas School Book Depository?
Mr. Hicks.
No, sir; I did not.
Mr. Ball.
Did you ever see a paper sack in the items that were taken from the Texas School Book Depository building?
Mr. Hicks.
Paper bag?
Mr. Ball.
Paper bag.
Mr. Hicks.
No, sir; I did not. It seems like there was some chicken bones or maybe a lunch; no, I believe that someone had gathered it up.
Mr. Ball.
Well, this was another type of bag made out of brown paper; did you ever see it?
Mr. Hicks.
No, sir; I don't believe I did. I don't recall it.
Mr. Ball.
I believe that's all, Mr. Hicks.
Mr. Hicks.
All right.
Mr. Ball.
This will be written up and submitted to you for signature if you want, or you can waive signature; which do you prefer?
Mr. Hicks.
Well, when would I have to come back to sign this?
Mr. Ball.
Probably next week sometime.
Mr. Hicks.
Well, that will be all right.
Mr. Ball.
Suit yourself, either way. If you want to waive signature it's all right with us or if you want to come back.
Mr. Hicks.
I will come back.
Mr. Ball.
All right, she will notify you. Thanks very much.

----------------------------
Harry D. Holmes

Testimony of Harry D. Holmes

The testimony of Harry D. Holmes was taken at 4 p.m., on April 2, 1964, in the office of the U.S. attorney, 301 Post Office Building, Bryan and Ervay Streets, Dallas, Tex., by Mr. David W. Belin, assistant counsel of the President's Commission.
Mr. Belin.
Sir, would you rise and raise your right hand and be sworn.
Do you solemnly swear that the testimony you are about to give will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God?
Mr. Holmes.
I do, sir.
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