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Warren Commission Hearings: Vol. VII - Page 149« Previous | Next »

(Testimony of Robert Studebaker Lee)

Mr. Ball.
Do you have the measurements of the boxes?
Mr. Studebaker.
Yes, I have all the measurements.
Mr. Ball.
Where?
Mr. Studebaker.
Down at the city hall.
Mr. Ball.
Let's take Exhibit J--how did the height of the little Rolling Reader box on the window sill compare with the height of the box you have marked "3" that had the indentation on it?
Mr. Studebaker.
It was lower, approximately 3 or 4 inches lower than the box marked "Exhibit 3, or No. 3" in the picture.
Mr. Ball.
Which box was lower, tell us which box was lower?
Mr. Studebaker.
The box on the sill was lower than the box--do you want to mark it "4"--the box in the window?
Mr. Ball.
The box in the window, you mark it "4," if you wish.
Mr. Studebaker.
(Marked instrument as requested by Counsel Ball.)
Mr. Ball.
Now, tell us which box, identifying it by number.
Mr. Studebaker.
Box No. 4 in the window was approximately 3 to 4 inches lower than Box No. 3 pictured in the picture of Exhibit J.
Mr. Ball.
Now, do you have any questions to ask him on any other subject matters, and if you do go ahead and ask him.
Mr. Stern.
Perhaps this is not the witness to establish it, but I think it might be useful to know if he has any opinion as to why the boxes were placed that way?
Mr. Studebaker.
A good gun rest.
Mr. Stern.
In that arrangement?
Mr. Studebaker.
Yes, it was a good gun rest.
Mr. Stern.
With the box in front lower than the box behind?
Mr. Studebaker.
In other words, it's like this---you see---it would be down on a level like this---it shows where the butt of the gun was up behind him here. He was down like this---nobody could see him from the street. He was behind this window. He didn't shoot this way because everybody would be looking right at him.
Mr. Ball.
Now, how big was this paper. that you saw--you saw the wrapper-- tell me about how big that paper bag was---how long was it?
Mr. Studebaker.
It was about, I would say, 3 1/2 to 4 feet long.
Mr. Ball.
The paper bag?
Mr. Studebaker.
Yes.
Mr. Ball.
And how wide was it?
Mr. Studebaker.
Approximately 8 inches.
Mr. Ball.
Mr. Studebaker, this testimony will be written up and it will be submitted to you if you wish, for your signature. You can read it over and sign it, or it is your option that you can waive your signature and we will send it right on up to the Commission. Which do you prefer?
Mr. Studebaker.
Whichever is the easiest for you.
Mr. Ball.
It is easier for you if you don't have to read it, of course, but you have a right to read it and sign it, whichever you want to do.
Mr. Studebaker.
Well, I will read it and sign it.
Mr. Ball.
All right. She will notify you.
Mr. Studebaker.
Okay.
Mr. Ball.
Thank you very much.
Mr. Studebaker.
Yes, sir.

C. N. Dhority

Testimony of C. N. Dhority

The testimony of C. N. Dhority was taken at 2:45 p.m., on April 6, 1964, in the office of the U.S. attorney, 301 Post Office Building, Bryan and Ervay Streets, Dallas, Tex., by Messrs. Joseph A. Ball, John Hart Ely, and Samuel A. Stern, assistant counsel of the President's Commission. Dr. Alfred Goldberg, historian was present.
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