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Warren Commission Hearings: Vol. VII - Page 109« Previous | Next »

(Testimony of Seymour Weitzman)

Mr. Ball.
You also said at the time the rifle was found at 1:22 p.m., is that correct?
Mr. Weitzman.
I believe that is correct. I wouldn't commit myself there because I am not sure; I'm not positive that was it.
Mr. Ball.
In this statement, it says Captain Fritz took charge of the rifle and ejected one live round from the chamber.
Mr. Weitzman.
Yes, sir.
Mr. Ball.
He did eject one live round?
Mr. Weitzman.
Yes, sir; he did eject one live round, one live round, yes, sir. You said remove anything from the rifle; I was not considering that a shell.
Mr. Ball.
I understand that. Now, in your statement to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, you gave a description of the rifle, how it looked.
Mr. Weitzman.
I said it was a Mauser-type action, didn't I?
Mr. Ball.
Mauser bolt action.
Mr. Weitzman.
And at the time I looked at it, I believe I said it was 2.5 scope on it and I believe I said it was a Weaver but it wasn't; it turned out to be anything but a Weaver, but that was at a glance.
Mr. Ball.
You also said it was a gun metal color?
Mr. Weitzman.
Yes.
Mr. Ball.
Gray or blue?
Mr. Weitzman.
Blue metal.
Mr. Ball.
And the rear portion of the bolt was visibly worn, is that worn?
Mr. Weitzman.
That's right.
Mr. Ball.
And the wooden portion of the rifle was what color?
Mr. Weitzman.
It was a brown, or I would say not a mahogany brown but dark oak brown.
Mr. Ball.
Rough wood, was it?
Mr. Weitzman.
Yes, sir; rough wood.
Mr. Ball.
And it was equipped with a scope?
Mr. Weitzman.
Yes, sir.
Mr. Ball.
Was it of Japanese manufacture?
Mr. Weitzman.
I believe it was a 2.5 Weaver at the time I looked at it. I didn't look that close at it; it just looked like a 2.5 but it turned out to be a Japanese scope, I believe.
Mr. Ball.
Didn't you, when you went over to the railroad yard, talk to some yardman?
Mr. Weitzman.
I asked a yardman if he had seen or heard anything during the passing of the President. He said he thought he saw somebody throw something through a bush and that's when I went back over the fence and that's when I found the portion of the skull. I thought it was a firecracker portion; that's what we first were looking for. This was before we knew the President was dead.
Mr. Ball.
Did the yardman tell you where he thought the noise came from?
Mr. Weitzman.
Yes, sir; he pointed out the wall section where there was a bunch of shrubbery and I believe that's to the right where I went over the wall where the steampipe was; that would be going north back toward the jail.
Mr. Ball.
I think that's all. Do you have any desire to read this over and sign it or will you waive signature?
Mr. Weitzman.
I will waive my signature. I don't think the Government is going to alter my statement any.

-------------------------
Capt. W. R. Westbrook

Testimony of Capt. W. R. Westbrook

The testimony of Capt. W. R. Westbrook was taken at 9 a.m., on April 6, 1964, in the office of the U.S. attorney, 301 Post Office Building, Bryan and Ervay Streets, Dallas, Tex., by Messrs. Joseph A. Ball, John Hart Ely, and Samuel A. Stern, assistant counsel of the President's Commission. Dr. Alfred Goldberg, historian, was present.
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