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Warren Commission Hearings: Vol. VI - Page 231« Previous | Next »

(Testimony of Frank E. Reilly)

This young lady will write it up and call you and you can come down here and sign it. How is that?

Mr. Reilly.
Well, will I have to come back?
Mr. Ball.
Yes; you will.
Mr. Reilly.
It is hard for me to get off.
Mr. Ball.
It is--why don't you waive your signature, if it is inconvenient to you, and we will offer this diagram as Exhibit A to your deposition.
Mr. Reilly.
All right.
(Instrument marked by the reporter as "Reilly Exhibit A," for identification.)

Earle V. Brown

Testimony of Earle V. Brown

The testimony of Earle V. Brown was taken at 4:40 p.m., on April 7, 1964, in the office of the U.S. attorney, 301 Post Office Building, Bryan and Ervay Street, Dallas, Tex., by Messrs. Joseph A. Ball and Samuel A. Stern, assistant counsel of the President's Commission.
Mr. Ball.
Would you please rise, raise your right hand and be sworn?
Mr. Brown.
All right.
Mr. Ball.
Do you solemnly swear the testimony you will give will be the the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God?
Mr. Brown.
I do.
Mr. Ball.
Sit down. State your name and address, please.
Mr. Brown.
Earle V. Brown, 618 North Rosemont.
Mr. Ball.
What is your occupation?
Mr. Brown.
Policeman.
Mr. Ball.
With the Dallas Police Department?
Mr. Brown.
Yes, sir.
Mr. Ball.
How long have you been a policeman?
Mr. Brown.
Fourteen years.
Mr. Ball.
Where were you born and what is your education and training?
Mr. Brown.
I was born on a farm near Lyons, Nebraska, in 1917, and I completed 12 years of schooling, high school.
Mr. Ball.
High school?
Mr. Brown.
Yes, sir.
Mr. Ball.
Then what did you do?

Mr. BROWN. Well, I stayed on the farm until 1939, then I moved to Ohio; Lima, Ohio. I was inducted into the Army and was in there 4 years, 5 months, discharged 1945, August 15, and I was here in Dallas actually when I was discharged and then back to Ohio for about 4 years. Then, let's see, that would be August of 1949, we came back to Dallas and then February 27, 1950, 1 joined the police force.
Mr. Ball.
Now, you are a patrolman, aren't you?
Mr. Brown.
Yes, sir.
Mr. Ball.
On November 22, 1964, were you assigned to a certain post on duty?
Mr. Brown.
Yes, sir.
Mr. Ball.
Where?

Mr. BROWN. That would be the railroad overpass over Stemmons Expressway service road.
Mr. Ball.
Is that the one that leads off Elm?
Mr. Brown.
You mean that crosses Elm?
Mr. Ball.
That crosses Elm, yes; the overpass across Elm. Mr. Brown. No, sir.
Mr. Ball.
What does it cross?

Mr. BROWN. It's over Stemmons Expressway; in other words, they make that turn off Elm and go up.
Mr. Ball.
You know where Elm, the corner of Elm and Houston is?
Mr. Brown.
Yes, sir.
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