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Warren Commission Hearings: Vol. V - Page 535« Previous | Next »

(Testimony of Bernard William Weissman Resumed)

Mr. Weissman.
be done, but it was expedient at the time to do this. And plus the fact that you certainly could not make these organizations any worse than they were. And as far as I felt, if we could bring them around to our way of thinking or my way of thinking, we could have brought them around to where they were more beneficial to the country rather than detrimental.
Senator COOPER. That is all I want to ask.
The Chairman.
I noticed on the list that you had there of techniques was hanging. Now, you said--you added to that, I think, that that meant hanging in effigy, you assumed. Is that right?
Mr. Weissman.
I am 100 percent sure, Your Honor, that that is what it meant. In other words, this was just ways to attract attention, and the college students are doing it all the time. It was just sort of tossing it all in a pot and then putting it down on paper.
The Chairman.
Is that not provocative to violence?
Mr. Weissman.
No: I think in the context that we meant it, that it was just another way of getting possibly some publicity--like if students in a university do not like their professor, for example, or if they win a football game, they will hang the opposing team in effigy, or the captain, or what have you. And it attracts a certain amount of publicity and talk.
We had to gain recognition in order to accomplish some of the goals that I had stated previously. And this is just another way. In this case, you have to consider us as young men, and effigy hanging, you know, is just part of a young idea.
The Chairman.
I think that is all. Thank you very much, Mr. Weissman. You may be excused. And Mr. Flannery, thank you very much for your cooperation.
If there are any questions you would like to ask, you may feel free to do so now.
Mr. Flannery.
I have nothing.
The Chairman.
Very well.
(At this point in the hearing, Chairman Warren left the hearing room and the witness Robert G. Klause entered.)

Robert G. Klause

Testimony of Robert G. Klause

Mr. Dulles.
Would you kindly raise your right hand?
Do you solemnly swear that the testimony you are about to give will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God?
Mr. Klause.
Yes, sir.
Mr. Jenner.
You are Robert G. Klause?
Mr. Klause.
Yes, sir.
Mr. Jenner.
And you appear here voluntarily today?
Mr. Klause.
Yes, sir.
Mr. Jenner.
I may say, Mr. Chairman, I reached Mr. Klause in Dallas yesterday afternoon. He had just returned from a 2-week vacation. He volunteered to come. The Secret Service got him on a plane with but minutes to spare, and no baggage. This he did to accommodate the Commission. Mr. Klause is here to testify with respect to the genesis and dissemination of the "Wanted For Treason" handbill, Commission Exhibit No. 996.
Mr. Dulles.
Proceed, please.
Mr. Jenner.
Your age, please?
Mr. Klause.
32.
Mr. Jenner.
You are a married man?
Mr. Klause.
Yes, sir.
Mr. Jenner.
You were born and reared in this country?
Mr. Klause.
Yes, sir.
Mr. Jenner.
Likewise your wife?
Mr. Klause.
Yes, sir.
Mr. Jenner.
And your parents?
Mr. Klause.
Yes, sir.
Mr. Jenner.
And you reside in Texas?
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