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Warren Commission Hearings: Vol. XIII - Page 13« Previous | Next »

(Testimony of L. C. Graves)

Testimony of L. C. Graves Resumed

The testimony of L. C. Graves was taken at 10:55 a.m., on April 17, 1964, in the office of the U.S. attorney, 301 Post Office Building, Bryan and Ervay Streets, Dallas, Tex., by Mr. Leon D. Hubert, Jr., assistant counsel of the President's Commission.
Mr. Hubert.
This is a continuation of the deposition of Mr. L. C. Graves of the Dallas Police Department.
Mr. Graves, as you know, my name is Leon Hubert, and I am one of the staff members of the Commission.

Previously, to wit, on March 24, 1964, you gave a deposition through which Mr. Butt Griffin appeared as a staff member. He cited to you at that time the authority under which he was acting, and also I think you took an oath at that time?
Mr. Graves.
Yes.
Mr. Hubert.
Are you willing to consider this morning's continuation as a part of that deposition given on March 24, 1964, in the sense that I am acting under the same authority and have the same authority as Mr. Griffin had?
Mr. Graves.
Yes.
Mr. Hubert.
Are you willing to consider also that you are under the same oath that you took at the earlier time for this later time?
Mr. Graves.
Yes.
Mr. Hubert.
And that this is Just a continuation?
Mr. Graves.
That's right.
Mr. Hubert.
As though it were the next day instead of 3 weeks later?
Mr. Graves.
Yes.
Mr. Hubert.
The purpose of asking you to come back is to clarify something which appears on pages 67 and 68 of your deposition on March 24, 1964. At line 17 on page 67, you asked Mr. Griffin as follows:
"Can I tell you something off the record?" And he answered in line 18, "Sure." Then, the record at line 19 indicates that there was a discussion off the record. Now, you give an answer between lines 21 and 24 as follows, to wit:
"I expect it doesn't matter. I thought about it later. It doesn't mean anything, I don't suppose, unless it has some sentimental value to him." Now, the next sentence and the next few lines which go over to page 68, do not seem to refer to the matter which in that quoted sentence you designated as "having some sentimental value." Now, I invite your attention to lines 15 through 22 on page 68 and ask you to read those lines.
Mr. Graves.
Starting with Mr. Griffin?
Mr. Hubert.
No; staring with your answer.
Mr. Graves.
"We asked him------"
Mr. Hubert.
No; don't read them out loud, just read them to yourself.
Mr. Graves.
[Read deposition as requested by Counsel Hubert.]
Mr. Hubert.
Now, I ask you if the thought contained in your testimony at page 68 between lines 15 and 22 does not relate to the matter which you had characterized as something having a sentimental value to him on lines 22 thru 24 on page 67?
Mr. Graves.
That's what I had reference to.
Mr. Hubert.
Would it be fair to say, then, that there was no more to the conversation off the record than the subject of something that had a sentimental value, and that the thing that did have sentimental value was explained by you in your answer on page 68 between lines 15 and 22?
Mr. Graves.
Not only would it be fair, but it would be truthful, because that's exactly what happened.
Mr. Hubert.
That's exactly what happened and nothing more?
Mr. Graves.
And nothing more or nothing less.
Mr. Hubert.
Thank you very much.
Mr. Graves.
That's all?
Mr. Hubert.
Yes; that's all. I hate to bring you down for something like this, but we had to do it to get it clear.
Mr. Graves.
That's all right--that's all right.

James Robert Leavelle

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