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Warren Commission Hearings: Vol. XI - Page 398« Previous | Next »

(Testimony of Ruth Hyde Paine)

Mrs. Paine.
with John Thorne and Jim Martin. That was probably the first weekend in December, or at least 2 weeks after the assassination--more likely 3.
Mr. Liebeler.
Do you recall what was among these things that Robert Oswald and Mr. Martin took?
Mrs. Paine.
They took the clothes from the closet, boxes and things that I ,did not look into. I have heard from the police that it also included an old camera which they had to chase later and went up to Robert Oswald's to find it.
Mr. Liebeler.
Were there any newspapers or magazines or anything like that, copies of The Militant or The Worker?
Mrs. Paine.
I did not see---most of what was done was what was put in. I busied myself in the bedroom getting out what was to go--what was the Oswald's property.
Mr. Liebeler.
Oswald did, of course, receive copies of The Worker and The Militant at your address?
Mrs. Paine.
I had seen that he received The Worker. I had never opened The Militant. I noticed on November 23 when I looked at the pile of second class mail and third class mail that was waiting for him to come that weekend that it included a copy of The Militant--that was the first I had noticed. This is after it had been in the newspaper.
Mr. Liebeler.
You don't remember which issue of The Militant that was, do you?
Mrs. Paine.
It must have been the current one.
Mr. Liebeler.
What happened to that?
Mrs. Paine.
I threw it away, along with The Worker and a Russian paper, I guess. It was unopened and still in its jacket.
Mr. Liebeler.
Do you remember when it had come?
Mrs. Paine.
During the week--well, no; it could have been during the 2 weeks since he hadn't been there over the weekend.
Mr. Liebeler.
Of course, he did come up on Thursday night?
Mrs. Paine.
Well, it wasn't discussed and it wasn't pointed out then.
Mr. Liebeler.
Well, how did he usually handle this problem with the mail--he was accustomed to receiving these pieces--the issues of the newspaper, at your address, wasn't he?
Mrs. Paine.
I handed it to him or laid them on the couch for him to look at when he arrived on Friday night.
Mr. Liebeler.
But he hadn't looked at these newspapers that had come during the period from his last visit to Thursday?
Mrs. Paine.
That's right; he had not been there.
Mr. Liebeler.
He didn't look at those on Thursday?
Mrs. Paine.
No.
Mr. Liebeler.
How many newspapers did you throw away, do you remember what they were?
Mrs. Paine.
Well, I recall particularly The Militant and The Worker and it seems to me there was the Russian Minsk paper too, but I'm not certain.
Mr. Liebeler.
Was there just one copy of The Militant?
Mrs. Paine.
Yes.
Mr. Liebeler.
And you don't remember when it had come?
Mrs. Paine.
No
Mr. Liebeler.
How many copies of The Worker?
Mrs. Paine.
One.
Mr. Liebeler.
I believe that's all. Thank you for coming in.
Mrs. Paine.
All right.

-----------

Michael Ralph Paine

Testimony of Michael Ralph Paine

The testimony of Michael Ralph Paine was taken at 12:05 p.m., on July 23, 1964, in the office of the U.S. Attorney, 301 Post Office Building, Bryan and Ervay Streets, Dallas, Tex., by Mr. Wesley J. Liebeler, assistant counsel of the President's Commission.
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