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Warren Commission Hearings: Vol. IX - Page 434« Previous | Next »

(Testimony of Ruth Hyde Paine Resumed)

Mrs. Paine.
No; I did not.
Mr. Jenner.
Were you present when she was examined?
Mrs. Paine.
Yes; I was.
Mr. Jenner.
And now, having examined the statement transcribed on Page 46, to the best of your recollection, to the extent it summarizes what was said, is it accurate?
Mrs. Paine.
Well, I particularly remember the part of the testimony or the statement, sworn statement, that talks about the rifle, that she had known there had been a rifle in the garage and that it was not there on the 22d, that she could not positively say it was her husband's rifle when they showed her a rifle at the police station. This is what I particularly remember.
Mr. Jenner.
Do you recall that she fixed the time when she had seen the blanket prior to November 22 as having been 2 weeks prior thereto?
Mrs. Paine.
She was indefinite, more so than the statement here.
Mr. Jenner.
The statement reads, "I opened the blanket and saw a rifle in it."
Mrs. Paine.
My recollection of that is that she opened the blanket and saw a portion of what she judged to be a rifle, having known already that her husband had one.
Mr. Jenner.
Did she identify the part she saw as the stock of the rifle?
Mrs. Paine.
I don't recall--that was all done by the police.
Mr. Jenner.
Mrs. Paine, is there anything in addition that has occurred to you--however, Mr. Howlett has called my attention to something we thought we might ask you before we close.
Directing your attention to the bottom drawer of the secretary in the kitchen- dining area of the house, was Lee Oswald familiar with the contents of that drawer?
Mrs. Paine.
I think it appears in my testimony at Washington that to the best of my knowledge neither he nor Marina saw me use the contents of that drawer.
Mr. Jenner.
Did you ever see either of them enter that drawer?
Mrs. Paine.
No.
Mr. Jenner.
All right. I think I am finished---is there anything you wish to add?
Mrs. Paine.
No.
Mr. Jenner.
It is now 10 minutes after 11 and we arrived here at 7:30 this evening. Mrs. Paine, again I express to you my personal appreciation of the length to which you have gone to be cooperative with me and with the Commission and with all of us undertaking this sometimes gruesome work.
Mrs. Paine.
Well, I am glad to help.
Mr. Jenner.
And you have been very helpful. Thank you.
Mrs. Paine.
Thank you.
Mr. Jenner.
This deposition will be transcribed. We will have it here in Dallas next week when I return. If you wish to read it, you may do so and you may call me at the United States attorney's office and it will be available to you to read. If the other transcript is ready, since I am officially authorized to have the same in my possession, I will do my best to bring one with me so that you may read your testimony of last week as well.
Mrs. Paine.
I would be very interested in that, thank you, and I could then sign this deposition.
Mr. Jenner.
Yes; you could sign this and the deposition I took of you on Saturday of last week.
Mrs. Paine.
All right. Thank you.
Mr. Jenner.
Thank you again, and that is all.

Michael R. Paine

Testimony of Michael R. Paine

The testimony of Michael R. Paine was taken at 2:30 p.m. on March 17, 1964, at 200 Maryland Avenue NE., Washington, D.C., by Messrs. Wesley J. Liebeler and Norman Redlich, assistant counsel of the President's Commission.
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