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Warren Commission Hearings: Vol. VIII - Page 180« Previous | Next »

(Testimony of Marilyn Dorothea Murret)

Mr. Liebeler.
Can you tell me how many times, up at your house, you were interviewed either by yourself or when your mother was there?
Miss MURRET. I think the FBI was there twice primarily for my mother, and I talked to one of the Secret Service men once myself. My mother was there, I mean, but he was talking to me.
Mr. Liebeler.
To the best of your recollection that is all, the only time that either the Secret Service or the FBI have been in touch with you?
Miss MURRET. Yes.
Mr. Liebeler.
If you can't think of anything else that you want to add at this point, I don't have any other questions. I would like to thank you very much for the cooperation that you have given to us. I want to express on behalf of the Commission our thanks for coming here and being as cooperative as you have been.

Charles Murret

Testimony of Charles Murret

The testimony of Charles Murret was taken on April 7, 1964, at the Old Civil Courts Building, Royal and Conti Streets, New Orleans, La., by Mr. Albert E. Jenner, Jr., assistant counsel of the President's Commission.

Charles Murret, 757 French Street, New Orleans, after first being duly sworn testified as follows:

Mr. Jenner.
You are Charles Murret, is that right?
Mr. Murret.
Yes, sir.
Mr. Jenner.
And you live at 757 French Street in New Orleans, is that right?
Mr. Murret.
Yes, sir.
Mr. Jenner.
Mr. Murret, Mr. Rankin, general counsel of the Commission, transmitted to Mrs. Lillian Murret, who is your wife, a letter in which he enclosed Senate Joint Resolution 137, authorizing the creation of a Commission to investigate the assassination of President John Fitzgerald Kennedy; Executive Order No. 11130 of President Lyndon B. Johnson, appointing that Commission and fixing its powers and duties, and a copy of the rules and regulations under which we take testimony before the Commission and also by way of deposition, such as this one. Did she receive those?
Mr. Murret.
Yes; she did.
Mr. Jenner.
And did you see them, and read them?
Mr. Murret.
Yes; I did.
Mr. Jenner.
You did read them?
Mr. Murret.
Yes.
Mr. Jenner.
I am Albert E. Jenner, Jr., member of the legal staff of the Commission, and the Commission is now performing its duties of making inquiries of the various people such as you, who, during their lifetime, came into contact, in the ordinary course of their lives, with various people who are part of this ball of wax. We are looking into the background of Lee Harvey Oswald in an attempt to determine if possible the motive for this tragic event which occurred November 22, 1963, which of course was the assassination of the President. In that connection, we would like to ask you a few questions about what you know, if anything, in that regard.
Mr. Murret.
Yes, sir.
Mr. Jenner.
First, do you have a nickname?
Mr. Murret.
Yes.
Mr. Jenner.
What is that nickname?
Mr. Murret.
Dutz.
Mr. Jenner.
Dutz?
Mr. Murret.
Yes.
Mr. Jenner.
How do you spell that?
Mr. Murret.
D-u-t-z. That's a name that my uncle gave me years ago and it caught on, with me being in the fight game and all, and it just stuck with me.
Mr. Jenner.
You say your uncle gave you that nickname?
Mr. Murret.
Yes; he was the one that gave me that name, and it stuck.
Mr. Jenner.
Did you do much prizefighting?
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