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Warren Commission Hearings: Vol. VIII - Page 15« Previous | Next »

(Testimony of Edward Voebel)

Mr. Voebel.
weather, and that can be a drab subject, although it is essential, but maybe that's why he quit coming; I don't know.
Mr. Jenner.
Was this CAP unit coeducational?
Mr. Voebel.
Yes.
Mr. Jenner.
Because sometimes that can stimulate your interest too, isn't that right?
Mr. Voebel.
Well, to tell you the truth, no. I had no girl friend out there at that time. I had a girl at the school, but that was it.
Mr. Jenner.
But there were girls out at this unit, attending these classes?
Mr. Voebel.
Yes; but they were kept pretty well separated from us. They might have been in the classes, but the girls out there didn't interest me.
Mr. Jenner.
Did they interest Lee?
Mr. Voebel.
No; I don't think so. He wasn't very interested in girls.
Mr. Jenner.
He was not?
Mr. Voebel.
No. At least it didn't impress me that he was. He didn't show any inclination toward girls at all, that I could see.
Mr. Jenner.
Did he have any sex deviation of any kind?
Mr. Voebel.
None whatever.
Mr. Jenner.
From your experience, he seemed to be perfectly normal in that respect?
Mr. Voebel.
Yes.
Mr. Jenner.
He might have been interested in girls, but he just wasn't pushing it at that time if he was, is that about it?
Mr. Voebel.
I think he was more bashful about girls than anything else. I think that was probably it.
Mr. Jenner.
Is there anything that you can think of from your acquaintance with Lee, from what you knew about him then, that you could tell us that would be helpful to the Commission, aside from what I have asked you?
Mr. Voebel.
No; I can't think of anything else.
Mr. Jenner.
Now, in taking these depositions, you have the privilege of reading and signing your deposition, or you can waive that privilege and let the reporter transcribe the deposition, and it will be sent on to Washington. However, if you want to read and sign it, it will be transcribed, and the U.S. attorney will contact you and let you know when you may come in and read and sign it. What is your preference in that regard?
Mr. Voebel.
Well, I don't have to read it and sign it. I have just told you what I know about it.
Mr. Jenner.
You prefer to waive that then?
Mr. Voebel.
Yes.
Mr. Jenner.
All right. Thank you for coming in.

William E. Wulf

Testimony of William E. Wulf

The testimony of William E. Wulf was taken on April 7-8, 1964, at the Old Civil Courts Building, Royal and Conti Streets, New Orleans, La., by Mr. Wesley J. Liebeler, assistant counsel of the President's Commission.

William E. Wulf, having been first duly sworn, was examined and testified as follows:

Mr. Liebeler.
Mr. Wulf, my name is Wesley J. Liebeler. I am a member of the legal staff of the President's Commission investigating the assassination of President Kennedy. Staff members have been authorized to take the testimony of witnesses by the Commission pursuant to authority granted to the Commission by Executive Order No. 11130, dated November 29, 1963, and Joint Resolution of Congress No. 137.
I understand that Mr. Rankin wrote to you last week----
Mr. Wulf.
Correct.
Mr. Liebeler.
Advising you that I would be in touch with you----
Mr. Wulf.
Right.
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