The John F. Kennedy Assassination Homepage

Navigation

  » Introduction
  » The Report
  » The Hearings

Volumes

  » Testimony Index
 
  » Volume I
  » Volume II
  » Volume III
  » Volume IV
  » Volume V
  » Volume VI
  » Volume VII
  » Volume VIII
  » Volume IX
  » Volume X
  » Volume XI
  » Volume XII
  » Volume XIII
  » Volume XIV
  » Volume XV
Warren Commission Hearings: Vol. VII - Page 544« Previous | Next »

(Testimony of Welcome Eugene Barnett)

Mr. Barnett.
I haven't talked to the officer.
Mr. Liebeler.
So you were pretty sure fairly quickly that the shots had come from the Texas School Depository?
Mr. Barnett.
Yes, sir.
Mr. Liebeler.
There was no notion in your mind that they could have come from these railroad tracks down here around the triple underpass?
Mr. Barnett.
To me, it is impossible.
Mr. Liebeler.
From the sound of the shots?
Mr. Barnett.
The sounds were high, and if it was down here, it wouldn't echo. It would be a low sound. For a shot to echo, it has to be high up.
Mr. Liebeler.
You mean to hang?
Mr. Barnett.
To hang like that.
Mr. Liebeler.
Now there were altogether three policemen assigned to the corner of Elm and Houston; is that right?
Mr. Barnett.
Yes, sir.
Mr. Liebeler.
Were there any other men assigned down the length of Elm Street here, that you know?
Mr. Barnett.
Not that I know of. There were no men stationed permanently there.
Mr. Liebeler.
The responsibility of control in that area would have been the job of the motorcycle riders and the Secret Service men?
Mr. Barnett.
That's right.
Mr. Liebeler.
Are there any general orders that are issued to police officers in regard to the scanning of windows when motorcades go by and that that sort of thing?
Mr. Barnett.
Well, in our training, we are told to scan windows, among lots of things. Look on top of buildings, windows, cars, but, of course, these things you are taught from the beginning. You don't have to be reminded of it every day. That is what you are taught to do, and it would take too long to remind us of everything they are supposed to do.
Mr. Liebeler.
Every time you went out on an assignment?
Mr. Barnett.
Yes, sir; it would be impossible. That is why you are trained for a job.
Mr. Liebeler.
Can you think of anything else that you saw or heard on that day that you haven't told us about now, that you think we would be interested in?
Mr. Barnett.
No, sir; I believe that is all.
Mr. Liebeler.
Thank you very much, officer, for coming in. We appreciate your cooperation.
Mr. Barnett.
You are welcome.

Eddy Raymond Walthers
------------------

Testimony of Eddy Raymond Walthers

The testimony of Eddy Raymond Walthers was taken at 8:16 p.m., on July 23, 1964, in the office of the U.S. attorney, 301 Post Office Building, Bryan and Ervay Streets, Dallas, Tex., by Mr. Wesley J. Liebeler, assistant counsel of the President's Commission.
Mr. Liebeler.
My name is Wesley J. Liebeler, [spelling] L-i-e-b-e-l-e-r, and I am an attorney on the staff of the President's Commission investigating the assassination of President Kennedy. I have been authorized to take your testimony by the Commission pursuant to authority granted to it by Executive Order 11130, dated November 29, 1963, and joint resolution of Congress 137. Pursuant to the rules of the Commission covering the taking of testimony, you are entitled to have an attorney present and you are entitled to 3 days' notice of your hearing. I know you didn't get the 3 days' notice of your hearing, but that can be waived by the witness and I assume that since you are here you are prepared to proceed and that we may proceed without your attorney being present?
« Previous | Next »

Found a Typo?

Click here

Partner Links

In Association with Amazon.co.uk

In Partnerschaft mit Amazon.de

Copyright by www.jfk-assassination.comLast Update: Wed, 3 Aug 2016 21:56:35 CET