The John F. Kennedy Assassination Homepage

Navigation

  » Introduction
  » The Report
  » The Hearings

Volumes

  » Testimony Index
 
  » Volume I
  » Volume II
  » Volume III
  » Volume IV
  » Volume V
  » Volume VI
  » Volume VII
  » Volume VIII
  » Volume IX
  » Volume X
  » Volume XI
  » Volume XII
  » Volume XIII
  » Volume XIV
  » Volume XV
Warren Commission Hearings: Vol. VII - Page 286« Previous | Next »

(Testimony of W. E. Barnes)

Mr. Barnes.
Yes; we discussed it.
Mr. Belin.
Without mentioning any names which might embarrass any individual, and without necessarily quoting yourself, what was the general nature or tenor of that discussion?
Mr. Barnes.
Disgusted.
Mr. Belin.
Was there any objections that were voiced about this, or not?
Mr. Barnes.
Yes; there were.
Mr. Belin.
What is the fact as to whether or not the presence of the press in any way affected the handling of this matter by the police department?
Mr. Barnes.
It would be just like you carrying on your work in your office when you had it full of newspapermen or anybody else, as far as that is concerned.
Mr. Belin.
Were there people other than newspapermen generally in the police headquarters?
Mr. Barnes.
It is hard to tell just who was who.
Mr. Belin.
Now you were not there at the time of the shooting of Lee Harvey Oswald by Jack Ruby, were you?
Mr. Barnes.
No; I was not.
Mr. Belin.
Did you see the television showing of the film that ran during the--during that time?
Mr. Barnes.
Yes; I did.
Mr. Belin.
You have had some experience, you said earlier, as a photographer, I believe, is that correct?
Mr. Barnes.
Yes.
Mr. Belin.
What is the fact as to whether or not the presence of light such as you say you saw in the movie film that you saw--what is the fact as to whether or not the presence of these lights would affect the ability of officers protecting Lee Harvey Oswald to discern movements of people?
Mr. Barnes.
Very much.
Mr. Belin.
In what way?
Mr. Barnes.
Blinding them. The flash from the many cameras that were present in the basement of the city hall, the lights set up by your TV cameramen, all of this would work against the officers in safeguarding any prisoner.
Mr. Belin.
Is there anything else you can think of with reference to the security matters of Lee Harvey Oswald that might be relevant here other than your statements about the press and the problems of light?
Mr. Barnes.
Other than the movement of him with the throngs of press men, which the security I thought was very good.
Mr. Belin.
Anything else you can think of right now?
Mr. Barnes.
None that I can think of at this time.
Mr. Belin.
Is there anything else that you care to add in this deposition that might in any way be helpful or relevant?
Mr. Barnes.
I think this pretty well covers it.
Mr. Belin.
Well, we want to thank you very much for your cooperation in coming down here, sergeant.
Mr. Barnes.
I am glad to come. Hate to come under these circumstances.
Mr. Belin.
We hate to be here under these circumstances. It is not a pleasant job for any of us, but it is a job that has to be done. All right, sir.
I forgot to say that you have a right to, if you like, to read your deposition and sign it, or else you can waive reading and have the court reporter send it to us in Washington.
Mr. Barnes.
I believe I will come back and let her show it to me, and I will sign it then.

------------------------
J. B. Hicks

Testimony of J. B. Hicks

The testimony of J. B. Hicks was taken at 3:10 p.m., on April 7, 1964, in the office of the U.S. attorney, 301 Post Office Building, Bryan and Ervay Streets, Dallas, Tex. by Messrs. Joseph A. Ball and Samuel A. Stern, assistant counsel of the President's Commission.
« Previous | Next »

Found a Typo?

Click here

Partner Links

In Association with Amazon.co.uk

In Partnerschaft mit Amazon.de

Copyright by www.jfk-assassination.comLast Update: Wed, 3 Aug 2016 21:56:35 CET