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Warren Commission Hearings: Vol. VII - Page 251« Previous | Next »

(Testimony of C. W. Brown)

Mr. Belin.
Did you, yourself, turn it over?
Mr. Brown.
No; Detective Dhority handled that.
Mr. Belin.
Detective Dhority handled that?
Mr. Brown.
We were keeping this evidence in a chain there. Mrs. Barbara Jeanette Davis handed him the spent cartridge. He gave it to the crime lab himself, which was initialled by both of us.
Mr. Belin.
Anything else, sir?
Mr. Brown.
None in regard to any evidence or identification of any further witnesses.
Mr. Belin.
Anything else in connection with either the assassination or the Tippit murder?
Mr. Brown.
None that I recall at this time, sir.
Mr. Belin.
Sir, you have an opportunity to either read the deposition when it is transcribed and sign it, or else waive the reading and have our court reporter send it directly to Washington. You can take your choice.
Mr. Brown.
Well, I have no reason to read it for any reason at all.
Mr. Belin.
Do you want to waive signing it then?
Mr. Brown.
That would be fine. Waive signing, and you can send it right out. To the best of my knowledge, that is everything that happened.
Mr. Belin.
Well, we certainly appreciate all of your cooperation and the cooperation of the Dallas Police Department.

----------------------------
L. C. Graves

Testimony of L. C. Graves

Testimony of L. C. Graves was taken at 3:10 p.m., on April 6, 1964, in the office of the U.S. attorney, 301 Post Office Building, Bryan and Ervay Streets, Dallas, Tex., by Mr. David W. Belin, assistant counsel of the President's Commission.
Mr. Belin.
Would you rise and raise your right hand. Do you solemnly swear that the testimony you are about to give will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God?
Mr. Graves.
I do.
Mr. Belin.
Would you state your name, for the reporter?
Mr. Graves.
My name is L. C. Graves.
Mr. Belin.
What is your occupation, Mr. Graves?
Mr. Graves.
I am a detective with the police department, city of Dallas.
Mr. Belin.
How old are you?
Mr. Graves.
I am 45 years old.
Mr. Belin.
Were you born and raised in Texas?
Mr. Graves.
Yes, sir; I was born and raised in Camp County, October 8, 1918.
Mr. Belin.
Where did you go to school?
Mr. Graves.
Leesburg--I mean to Pittsburg.
Mr. Belin.
How far did you get through school?
Mr. Graves.
I finished 10 1/2 years of schooling in Pittsburg and Leesburg, then received a high school diploma after such time.
Mr. Belin.
Then what did you do?
Mr. Graves.
Then what did I do?
Mr. Belin.
Yes, sir.
Mr. Graves.
Oh, let's see. From there I went into the CCC camp.
Mr. Belin.
For a period of several years?
Mr. Graves.
Let's see, I think a couple of years, approximately.
Mr. Belin.
Then what did you do?
Mr. Graves.
I came out and stayed out about a couple of months and then I Joined the Texas National Guard, and shortly after that it mobilized and I went into active service, at which time I stayed until I was discharged after the war.
Mr. Belin.
Was this an honorable discharge?
Mr. Graves.
Yes.
Mr. Belin.
What were your duties in the Army, say, generally?
Mr. Graves.
Well, I was in the Infantry, and I was a mess sergeant, and I cooked principally all the time I was in.
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