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Warren Commission Hearings: Vol. VII - Page 158« Previous | Next »

(Testimony of C. N. Dhority)

Mr. Dhority.
weak all the way and as we was turning into the hospital, the only time he showed any signs of life and he started a muscle reaction then----
Mr. Ball.
He was unconscious, was he?
Mr. Dhority.
He was unconscious all the time, and when he went into the operating room, Detective Graves went in with him there and Captain Fritz left and told me to arrange for the security of Oswald in the hospital, and I was talking to Mr. Price, who is the administrator of the hospital, and we were looking over a wing, when we got word that he was dead, so I went back then and contacted Captain Fritz by phone and then got Oswald's clothing and had Oswald's mother and wife look at Oswald's body and then carried him to the morgue where I got Dr. Rose to photograph him with color pictures before he did the autopsy.
Mr. Ball.
Now, this will all be written up and it will be submitted to you if you wish, and you can read it over and correct it and sign it if you want to, or you have the option to waive your signature, and in which event this young lady will write it up and send it on to the Commission.
Mr. Dhority.
Well, I will just waive my signature.
Mr. Ball.
All right. Fine. Thank you very much.

-----------------------------------
Richard M. Sims

Testimony of Richard M. Sims

The testimony of Richard M. Sims was taken at 10:20 a.m., on April 6, 1964, in the office of the U.S. attorney, 301 Post Office Building, Bryan and Ervay Streets, Dallas, Tex., by Messrs. Joseph A. Ball, John Hart Ely, and Samuel A. Stern, assistant counsel of the President's Commission. Dr. Alfred Goldberg, historian, was present.
Mr. Ball.
Will you stand up and be sworn?
Do you solemnly swear that the testimony you will give before the Commission will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God?
Mr. Sims.
I do.
Mr. Ball.
Will you state your name, please?
Mr. Sims.
Richard M. Sims.
Mr. Ball.
And what is your business or occupation?
Mr. Sims.
Police department, city of Dallas.
Mr. Ball.
And what is your position with the police department?
Mr. Sims.
Detective in the homicide and robbery bureau since August 2, 1948.
Mr. Ball.
Will you tell me something about yourself, where you were born and educated and what you have done before you went with the police department?
Mr. Sims.
I was born and raised here in Dallas and I went to school--grade school in Dallas, but moved out to a little city called Hutchins, south of Dallas, and finished my education out there, and joined the Navy when I was 17, and was discharged when I was 21, and I came to work down here when I was 23.
Mr. Ball.
With the police department?
Mr. Sims.
Yes, sir.
Mr. Ball.
And you have been with them ever since?
Mr. Sims.
Yes.
Mr. Ball.
And you have been with homicide how long?
Mr. Sims.
Since September 1957.
Mr. Ball.
On November 22, 1963, what were your hours of duty?
Mr. Sims.
Well, actually, my hours of duty were from 4 to midnight, but because the President was going to be in Dallas, I came to work early because we was assigned with Captain Fritz to be down at the Trade Mart when the President arrived.
Mr. Ball.
What time did you go to the Trade Mart?
Mr. Sims.
It was around 10 o'clock, I believe.
Mr. Ball.
In the morning?
Mr. Sims.
Yes, sir; 10 a.m.---Captain Fritz and Boyd and I.
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