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Warren Commission Hearings: Vol. VI - Page 36« Previous | Next »

(Testimony of Dr. Robert Mcclelland Nelson)

Mr. Specter.
And, during the course of our conversations at that time, we cover the same material in question form here and to which you have responded in answer form with the court reporter here today ?
Dr. Mcclelland.
Yes.
Mr. Specter.
And has the information which you have given me on record been the same as that which you gave me off of the record in advance?
Dr. Mcclelland.
Yes.
Mr. Specter.
Do you have any interest, Dr. McClelland in reading your testimony over or signing it at the end, or would you be willing to waive such signature of the testimony?
Dr. Mcclelland.
I would be willing to waive my signature.
Mr. Specter.
Thank you so much for coming and giving us your deposition today.
Dr. Mcclelland.
All right, thank you.

Testimony of Robert M. Mcclelland Resumed

The testimony of Dr. Robert M. McCLELLAND was taken at 3:25 p.m., March 25, 1964, at Parkland Memorial Hospital, Dallas, Tex., by Mr. Arlen Specter, assistant counsel of the President's Commission.
Mr. Specter.
May the record show that Dr. Robert M. McClelland has return to have a brief additional deposition concerning a translation of "L' Express which has been called to my attention in the intervening time which has elapsed between March 21, when I took Dr. McClelland's deposition on the first occasion, and today.
Dr. Mcclelland.
will you raise your right hand? Do you solemnly swear that the testimony you will give to the President's Commission in this deposition proceeding will be the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth, so help you God ?
Dr. Mcclelland.
I do.
Mr. Specter.
Dr. McClelland, I show you a translation from the French, of the magazine, "L' Express" issue of February 20, 1964, and ask you if you would read this item, with particular emphasis on a reference to a quotation or statement made by you to a reporter from the St, Louis Post Dispatch.
Dr. Mcclelland.
(Examined instrument referred to.)
Mr. Specter.
Now, have you had an opportunity to read over that excerpt?
Dr. Mcclelland.
Yes.
Mr. Specter.
Did you talk to a reporter from the St. Louis Post Dispatch about this matter ?
Dr. Mcclelland.
Yes.
Mr. Specter.
And what was his name?
Dr. Mcclelland.
Richard Dudman.
Mr. Specter.
And when did you have that conversation with Mr. Dudman
Dr. Mcclelland.
As well as I recall, it was the day after the assassination, as nearly as I can recall, but I'm not certain about that.
Mr. Specter.
Will you tell me as closely as you remember what he said to you and you said to him, please?
Dr. Mcclelland.
The main point he seemed to be making was to attempt to define something about the wound, the nature of the wound, and as near as I can recall, I indicated to him that the wound was a small undamaged--- appearing punctate area in the skin of the neck, the anterior part of the neck, which had the appearance of the usual entrance wound of a bullet, but that this certainly could not be----you couldn't make a statement to that effect with any complete degree of certainty, though we were, as I told him, experienced in seeing wounds of this nature, and usually felt that we could tell the difference between an entrance and an exit wound, and this was, I think, in essence what I told him about the nature of the wound.
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