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Warren Commission Hearings: Vol. IV - Page 89« Previous | Next »

(Testimony of Paul Morgan Stombaugh)

Testimony of James C. Cadigan

Mr. Dulles.
Would you mind standing and raising your right hand?
Do you swear the testimony you give before the Commission is the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God?
Mr. Cadigan.
Yes, sir.
Mr. Dulles.
Thank you.
Mr. Eisenberg.
Mr. Cadigan, can you state your full name and position?
Mr. Cadigan.
James C. Cadigan, special agent of the FBI, assigned as an examiner of questioned documents in the laboratory here in Washington.
Mr. Eisenberg.
What is your education, Mr. Cadigan?
Mr. Cadigan.
I have a Master of Science degree from Boston College in Newton, Mass. Upon being appointed in the FBI, I was given on-the-job training, which consisted of working with various examiners, conducting experiments, reading books, attending lectures, and so forth.
Mr. Eisenberg.
Mr. Cadigan, how long have you been in the questioned document field?
Mr. Cadigan.
Twenty-three and a half years.
Mr. Eisenberg.
And during that time have you examined papers to determine their possible origin?
Mr. Cadigan.
Yes.
Mr. Eisenberg.
Can you estimate the number of such examinations you have conducted?
Mr. Cadigan.
No; not with any degree of accuracy, except many, many specimens, many, many comparisons.
Mr. Eisenberg.
Have you testified on that subject in court?
Mr. Cadigan.
Yes, sir.
Mr. Eisenberg.
Many times?
Mr. Cadigan.
I won't say many, no; because most of the testimony I have given in court relates to other phases of the work. Strictly on paper, I would say not more than two or three times.
Mr. Eisenberg.
But you have made more than two or three examinations of paper?
Mr. Cadigan.
Oh, yes; far more.
Mr. Dulles.
Running into the hundreds and thousands?
Mr. Cadigan.
Yes, sir.
Mr. Eisenberg.
Mr. Chairman, may I have this witness admitted as an expert witness?
Mr. Dulles.
He shall be admitted as an expert on this subject.
Mr. Eisenberg.
Mr. Cadigan, I hand you an object made of paper, Commission Exhibit 142, also known as Commission Exhibit 626, and ask you if you are familiar with this object?
Mr. Cadigan.
Yes; I am.
Mr. Eisenberg.
And did you examine this object, this paper bag, to determine its origin, possible origin?
Mr. Cadigan.
Yes.
Mr. Eisenberg.
Can you tell us how you conducted that examination?
Mr. Cadigan.
Yes.
I first saw this paper bag on November 23, 1963, in the FBI laboratory, along with the sample of paper and tape from the Texas School Book Depository obtained November 22, 1963, which is FBI Exhibit D-1.
Mr. Eisenberg.
Is that the sample that you are referring to, that you are holding in your hand?
Mr. Cadigan.
Yes.
Mr. Eisenberg.
And that is marked, as you said, "Paper sample from first floor Texas School Book Depository" and has certain other markings including the words "shipping department"?
Mr. Cadigan.
Yes.
Mr. Eisenberg.
May I have this admitted, Mr. Chairman?
Mr. Dulles.
That may be admitted.
Mr. Eisenberg.
That will be No. 677.
Mr. Dulles.
677 may be admitted.
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