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Warren Commission Hearings: Vol. II - Page 124« Previous | Next »

(Testimony of William Robert , Special Agent, Greer)

I was kind of shocked at the time, I guess anything could have and I wouldn't have known what hit me. You are tense, I was pretty tense, and naturally my thoughts were the hospital, and how fast I could get there, and probably I could have been injured and not even known I was injured. I was in that position.

Mr. Specter.
Mr. Greer, what is your best estimate and recollection of the time that the shooting occurred?
Mr. Greer.
Well, Mr. Kellerman saying 12:30 to me makes me--that stays in my mind foremost, and that was when we had just left the scene of the shooting, a few seconds or a second or two from it. That is why that 12:30 stays in my mind, him saying 12:30 to me right after the shooting, he said. His watch may not have been correct but that is what he said to me at the time.
Mr. Specter.
What is your best estimate of the distance between the point where the assassination occurred and Parkland Hospital?
Mr. Greer.
No, sir; I haven't. It seemed like endless miles and probably wasn't very far, but it seemed like to me it was endless getting there. I was--
Mr. Specter.
Are you able to give us an estimate with reasonable accuracy on the time it took?
Mr. Greer.
No, sir.
Mr. Specter.
From the time it took from the point of the shooting until you arrived at Parkland Hospital?
Mr. Greer.
I didn't check anything but I thought that probably it would probably be 6 or 8 minutes, I am not too sure, somewhere in the vicinity of 5 and 10 minutes. I would have to guess at that.
Mr. Specter.
How did you know which entrance of the hospital to go to?
Mr. Greer.
I followed the car that was in front of me right to where he stopped and I was right at the entrance. The car stopped and I stopped alongside of him.
Mr. Specter.
Which entrance was that?
Mr. Greer.
It seems, I think it was the emergency entrance, I am almost sure. It was like a bay that you could pull in and out of. It looked like an ambulance entrance.
Mr. Specter.
What did you observe with respect to President Kennedy's condition on arrival at the Parkland Hospital?
Mr. Greer.
To the best of my knowledge he was laying, it seemed across Mrs. Kennedy, looked like laying across her lap or in front of her, I am not too sure which, I opened the doors--the doors were opened before I got to it, someone else had opened the doors and they were trying to get Connally out, and Mrs. Connally out of the seats so they could get to the President.
Mr. Specter.
What did you observe about the President with respect to his wounds?
Mr. Greer.
His head was all shot, this whole part was all a matter of blood like he had been hit.
Mr. Specter.
Indicating the top and right rear side of the head?
Mr. Greer.
Yes, sir; it looked like that was all blown off.
Mr. Specter.
Yes.
Mr. Greer.
I run around the front of the car and got hold of a stretcher or thing and I got hold of it to keep it steady while they lifted the President's body onto it and then I helped pull the front end of it into the emergency room.
Mr. Specter.
Who was first removed from the automobile?
Mr. Greer.
Governor Connally was first removed. He was on the jump seats.
Mr. Specter.
And what, if anything, did you observe as to Governor Connally's condition on arrival at Parkland Hospital?
Mr. Greer.
The best of my recollection he was lying across the seat toward Mrs. Connally when they picked him up and got him out of the car. And he was rushed in first into the hospital. That is when I got the stretcher to bring it, to hold it until they would get the President on it, on the right side of the car. They took him out on the side he was sitting on, that side of the car.
Mr. Specter.
Were you able to make any personal observation about Governor Connally's specific wound?
Mr. Greer.
No, sir. I didn't know how badly anyone really was injured. I had great thoughts the President was still living and that was the only thing I was thinking about was to get them in quick.
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