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Warren Commission Hearings: Vol. XIV - Page 624« Previous | Next »

(Testimony of Joseph Alexander Peterson)

Mr. Peterson.
Morning News people we knew. That was fine, but anybody else, I don't know who we were talking to. A lot of nuts would be calling you up.
Mr. Specter.
Did you know anything about Mr. Ruby's troubles with the American Guild of Variety Artists?
Mr. Peterson.
Jack had all kinds of problems and troubles with unions and everybody else. Jack was like every other struggling nightclub owner who was trying to get along the cheapest way he could. That was it.
Mr. Specter.
Does the telephone number Riverside 8-1434 in Dallas mean anything to you?
Mr. Peterson.
Let me see. No, I don't know. Probably does, but I don't remember.
Mr. Specter.
Do you have anything to add which you think would be helpful to the President's Commission in any way?
Mr. Peterson.
No.
Mr. Specter.
Prior to the time when we went on the record here, Mr. Peterson, did you and I. have a very brief conversation concerning your knowledge of Jack Ruby?
Mr. Peterson.
Yes; we did.
Mr. Specter.
Have I covered those questions and a number of others during the course of the deposition on the record?
Mr. Peterson.
Yes.
Mr. Specter.
And is the information which you gave to me on the record the same as what you told me off the record earlier?
Mr. Peterson.
Yes; what I could remember--wait a minute, now. You said "before"----
Mr. Specter.
We have covered, have we not----
Mr. Peterson.
Right.
Mr. Specter.
Everything on the record which we covered before?
Mr. Peterson.
Right.
Mr. Specter.
Under the rules of the President's Commission, Mr. Peterson, you have a right to read and to sign this deposition if you want to. Do you want to do that or would you be willing to waive that reading and signing?
Mr. Peterson.
Well, what does--do you want me to sign it? I will sign it.
Mr. Specter.
Do you have any special interest in rending it and signing it?
Mr. Peterson.
Well, I'd like to read it, then I will sign it. I have no objection to signing it but I'd like to read what I'm signing.
Mr. Specter.
That is fair enough. You did receive a letter from the Commission?
Mr. Peterson.
Yes.
Mr. Specter.
Informing you you had a right to counsel if you wanted one here today?
Mr. Peterson.
Right. Right.
Mr. Specter.
And the other rules and regulations concerning the proceedings in depositions before the President's Commission, did you not?
Mr. Peterson.
Right.
Mr. Specter.
And appearing here today was satisfactory with you as you have appeared and testified without the representation of counsel?
Mr. Peterson.
Right.
Mr. Specter.
All right.. That concludes the deposition, then, Mr. Peterson. We shall make available a copy of the transcript for you to read and sign.

Harry N. Olsen

Testimony of Harry N. Olsen

The testimony of Harry N. Olsen was taken at 2:50 p.m., on August 6, 1964, at the U.S. Post Office Building, 312 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Calif., by Mr. Arlen Specter, assistant counsel of the President's Commission.
Mr. Specter.
May the record show that this deposition proceeding of the President's Commission on the Assassination of President Kennedy is being held
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