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Warren Commission Hearings: Vol. XIV - Page 364« Previous | Next »

(Testimony of Nancy Perrin Rich)

Mrs. Rich.
July of--August of 1960, I believe 1961. I have forgotten.
Mr. Griffin.
Prior to that time you had never been in any trouble with the police?
Mrs. Rich.
No; except when I was 16, I was driving a car with no license and had been taking some medicine and I hit a pole with it, and lied to my uncle, who was the judge, and he made me pay a fine. He made me spend overnight in our own little jail in our own little town to teach me a lesson, and it did. He said if I had not lied, it would have been all right.
Mr. Hubert.
What was the significance of your remark that when you-worked he worked, and When you did not work----
Mrs. Rich.
As long as I was hustling he would work, and as long as I wasn't hustling he would not work.
Mr. Hubert.
Does that mean he was----
Mrs. Rich.
My husband turned me out. That is what it means.
Mr. Hubert.
Turned you out of the house?
Mrs. Rich.
This is an expression used in that particular trade.
Mr. Hubert.
What you mean is----
Mrs. Rich.
He taught me how to be a prostitute, obtained dates for me, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. I married into a very respectable family. I come from a respectable family. And I came here today all set on any question such as this to take the fifth amendment, or just refuse to answer.
Mr. Hubert.
Well, ma'am, let the record show that a moment ago, when you said you would rather not go into this, you were not pressed into going into it, but you said you wished to do so, is that correct?
Mrs. Rich.
That is not correct.
Mr. Hubert.
What was the situation?
Mrs. Rich.
Why did I do it?
Mr. Hubert.
No; why did you tell us about this?
Mrs. Rich.
I am sorry. Change my statement from that is not correct to that is correct.
Mr. Hubert.
That is to say a moment ago--let me get this clear--when you said that is a matter you did not want to go into, you will agree with me, will you not, that I did not pursue the matter, but that you then said "I might as well tell you" and proceeded to do so.
Mrs. Rich.
That is correct. Why did I do so?
Mr. Hubert.
No, ma'am; I am not asking you why.
Mrs. Rich.
All right, that's fine.
Mr. Hubert.
I think we do have the date of your husband's death.
Mrs. Rich.
August 29, 1962, city of New Orleans.
Mr. Hubert.
And you say there was an autopsy made?
Mrs. Rich.
Yes; there was. He had been dead 2 days before I knew it. I wasn't there. I think all I felt was a great sense of relief.
Mr. Hubert.
Now, Mrs. Rich, is it not a fact that there has been no off-the-record conversation between us at all?
Mrs. Rich.
That is correct?
Mr. Hubert.
IS it not a fact that all that has occurred between you and me in this interview, with Mr. Griffin, is all on the record?
Mrs. Rich.
That is correct.
Mr. Hubert.
All right. Thank you, Mrs. Rich.

-------------------

Earl Ruby

Testimony of Earl Ruby

The testimony of Earl Ruby was taken at 9 a.m, on June 3, 1964, at 200 Maryland Avenue NE., Washington, D.C., by Messrs. Burt W. Griffin and Leon D. Hubert, Jr., assistant counsel of the President's Commission.
Mr. Hubert.
This is the deposition of Earl Ruby.
My name is Leon D. Hubert. I am a member of the Advisory Staff of the General Counsel of the President's Commission on the Assassination of President Kennedy.
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