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Warren Commission Hearings: Vol. XIV - Page 330« Previous | Next »

(Testimony of George Senator Resumed)

Mr. Griffin.
As to what he had in there?
Mr. Senator.
In the trunk?
Mr. Griffin.
Yes.
Mr. Senator.
No. To me it looked like a bunch of garbage he had in there.
Mr. Griffin.
Have you ever had occasion to drive his automobile?
Mr. Senator.
Yes; but very seldom because he didn't want me to handle it and I'll tell you why. No insurance. That is why he didn't want me to drive his car. Very seldom was I ever allowed to drive that car.
Mr. Griffin.
On the occasions when you drove his automobile, from where did you get the automobile keys?
Mr. Senator.
From him.
Mr. Griffin.
Off of his person?
Mr. Senator.
Yes; from the house, yes, when he was home. And sometimes I would drive for him when he is tired, like he feels he is going to fall asleep, and I have done this you know from the club to the apartment where he feels he maybe fall asleep at the wheel. This is one of the things where he wouldn't let me drive because he had no insurance, and I wasn't anxious to drive the car on account of that either.
Mr. Griffin.
Now you and I have had lunch together.
Mr. Senator.
Yes.
Mr. Griffin.
And we have had breaks here and on these occasions we have talked and you have talked with Mr. Hubert also on these occasions. Is there anything that we talked with you about in these times when we haven't had a court reporter present that we haven't covered here in our deposition?
Mr. Senator.
It would be hard for me to think what you have left out, you know. I have never had a questioning like this in my life before. When I originally came down here I thought I would only be here I thought the questioning would probably be similar to being questioned by the FBI or the Secret Service. First of all how was I to know? What was I to expect, see? I just couldn't believe that I would be here 2 clays. I couldn't think how it was possible where you could ask me so many questions, both of you.
Mr. Hubert.
In any case you don't recall anything dealing with the case, an aspect of it that was the subject of a conversation which has not been discussed on the record?
Mr. Senator.
Offhand, I can't. Offhand, I just can't think of any because I think you all know more than I know. If you can remember the Times Square Cafeteria you know more than I know. You are not going to put that too, are you?
Mr. Griffin.
Let me then ask this one final question.
Mr. Senator.
Yes.
Mr. Griffin.
If anything should come to your attention in the future, which pertains to the Ruby case that could be of assistance to us, will you contact somebody in the Government and let them know so that we can have a complete record here. He is nodding his head yes.
Mr. Senator.
Because he can't write the ned down there?
Mr. Hubert.
Thank you very much indeed for coming.
Mr. Griffin.
I want to say to him that it has been a pleasure to talk with you; we think your cooperation has been most helpful.

Nancy Perrin Rich

Testimony of Nancy Perrin Rich

The testimony of Nancy Perrin Rich was taken at 11 a.m., on June 2, 1964, at 200 Maryland Avenue NE., Washington, D.C., by Messrs. Burt W. Griffin and Leon D. Hubert, Jr., assistant counsel of the President's Commission.
Mr. Hubert.
This is the deposition of Nancy Perrin Rich.
Mrs. Rich, my name is Leon D. Hubert. I am a member of the advisory staff of the general counsel of the President's Commission on the Assassination of President Kennedy.
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