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Warren Commission Hearings: Vol. XIV - Page 243« Previous | Next »

(Testimony of George Senator Resumed)

Mr. Griffin.
And you opened out onto this balcony?
Mr. Senator.
Yes.
Mr. Griffin.
Along this balcony, how many other suites were there along that balcony?
Mr. Senator.
Running our way, you have got to transplant in your mind--in other words, say that I am facing my door right now.
Mr. Griffin.
Yes.
Mr. Senator.
And the balcony goes U-shaped like this. Do you follow me? In other words, this is all space out here.
Mr. Griffin.
Everything in front of you is space?
Mr. Senator.
Space. Now right past mine, if you turn to the right of mine, then you walk down another balcony. See, there are balconies on this side plus balconies this way.
Mr. Griffin.
Well, now along this same level that you were on, and following the whole set of balconies around on the same level, how many different----
Mr. Senator.
The entire level.
Mr. Griffin.
Yes. How many different?
Mr. Senator.
This is another guesswork. I would say, I would sort of estimate around a dozen places, a dozen apartments.
Mr. Griffin.
Now these dozen different apartments, was there a single stairway that led up to that level, or was there more than one stairway?
Mr. Senator.
No; there was two stairways. There was one from the front, there was one level that come up South Ewing. In other words, you drive around through the back where you park your cars and come up this way.
Mr. Griffin.
Another stairway?
Mr. Senator.
Yes.
Mr. Griffin.
Now on this level how many of those dozen suites there perhaps how many of those people did you know?
Mr. Senator.
I didn't know any. I never had a conversation with any of them. Now I said hello to the girls next door, but I never talked to them, never had a conversation with them. Of course, they were young girls, not of my category. And the people on the sides, I didn't know any of them. In other words, anybody who walked in, you know, you would say hello whether you knew them or not. But there wasn't a conversation.
Mr. Griffin.
Mr. Hubert, I want to carry this on a little bit from what happened after Jack left the apartment.
Mr. Hubert.
I promised him that we would stop at 5 because he expressed the fact that he was somewhat fatigued. He has been up since 2:30. I think rather than get into another segment we might adjourn for the day. You were turning to another subject?
Mr. Griffin.
I was going to take him .up to the time when he left the apartment.
Mr. Hubert.
That I think would be another subject.
Mr. Griffin.
In other words, the interval between when Jack left and----
Mr. Hubert.
We have it now to the point where Jack has left the apartment, and I think that is a good stopping. point. It is a quarter past 5 and I had promised we would stop at 5.
Mr. Senator.
I am not mad at you.

Testimony of George Senator Resumed

The testimony of George Senator. was taken at 8:35 a.m., on April 22, 1964, at 200 Maryland Avenue NE. Washington, D.C., by Messrs. Burt W. Griffin and Leon D. Hubert, Jr., assistant counsel of the President's Commission.
Mr. Hubert.
Mr. Senator, you will understand that this is a continuation of the deposition which was begun yesterday, and that Mr. Griffin and I, who are examining you, are doing so under the same authority and under the same conditions as were indicated to you at the beginning of the deposition yesterday.
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