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Warren Commission Hearings: Vol. XI - Page 193« Previous | Next »

(Testimony of James L. Ritchie)

Mr. Ritchie.
No, sir; just put "file" on it.
Mr. Coleman.
Did you discuss it with Mr. Seeley or anyone else?
Mr. Ritchie.
I took the file to Mr. Seeley.
Mr. Coleman.
Did you summarize for him what was in the file?
Mr. Ritchie.
No; I did not. I don't know what my exact words were to him. I must have said, "Look at this."
Mr. Coleman.
Didn't you say to him, "This guy was a defector"?
Mr. Ritchie.
I don't recall what I said to him, back in October. I know I said something to him. I directed his attention to it.
Mr. Coleman.
Then did he discuss it with you?
Mr. Ritchie.
No.
Mr. Coleman.
You put the file on his desk and you didn't have anything to do with it?
Mr. Ritchie.
That is right.
Mr. Coleman.
Why did you put it on his desk?
Mr. Ritchie.
He was in charge of the section, and I just brought it to him for his attention.
Mr. Coleman.
Would you do that with every file that you are asked to review?
Mr. Ritchie.
Those files that I thought should be brought to his attention; yes.
Mr. Coleman.
So, therefore, you felt that this file was other than just the routine file that you would look at and put back?
Mr. Ritchie.
Yes, sir.
Mr. Coleman.
Wouldn't you tell Mr. Seeley something as to why you thought it was other than routine?
Mr. Ritchie.
No, sir; I just said "Look at it." I presume I just directed his attention to the file, and that he should look at it.
Mr. Coleman.
And then you had no more discussion with him?
Mr. Ritchie.
None that I can recall.
Mr. Coleman.
Did you say anything to him, like for example, "This guy the last time he was abroad tried to, or at least threatened that he would give to the Soviets whatever he had learned in the Marine Corps with reference to our radar information"?
Mr. Ritchie.
I have no recollection of my conversation with Mr. Seeley. All I know is my usual procedure is I review a case. If there is no passport action to be taken, I place it, mark it "file" and place it in the box to go to file.
Mr. Coleman.
Without Mr. Seeley taking a look at it?
Mr. Ritchie.
Without Mr. Seeley ever seeing it.
Mr. Coleman.
And this one you felt--
Mr. Ritchie.
And this one I felt he should see.
Mr. Coleman.
But you didn't give him any memorandum--
Mr. Ritchie.
No, sir.
Mr. Coleman.
Or point out what he should look at?
Mr. Ritchie.
I may have directed his attention to the case, but I have no independent recollection of it.
Mr. Coleman.
Then after October 22, 1963, you had no contact with Oswald, the file or anything else?
Mr. Ritchie.
No, sir; let me change that. I reviewed the file before I came here. I have reviewed the file.
Mr. Coleman.
Oh, sure. That is all. Thank you, sir.

------------------

Carroll Hamilton Seeley, Jr.

Testimony of Carroll Hamilton , Jr. Seeley

The testimony of Carroll Hamilton Seeley, Jr., was taken at 11 a.m., on June 17, 1964, at 200 Maryland Avenue NE. Washington, D.C., by Messrs. William T. Coleman, Jr., and W. David Slawson, assistant counsel of the President's Commission. Thomas Ehrlich, Esq., Special Assistant to the Legal Adviser, Department of State, and James L. Ritchie, were present.
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