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Warren Commission Hearings: Vol. XI - Page 123« Previous | Next »

(Affidavit of Alexander Kleinlerer)


that he was frustrated because he was not looked up to; and that he was dissatisfied with everything, including himself.
27. Mrs. Hall told me on several occasions that Marina had said to her that she was quite afraid of Oswald and that when she got to know a little more English she intended to leave him. Oswald did not care who was present as far as his boorish attitude toward Marina was concerned. It seemed that he did not care what others thought about anything.
28. Anna Meller, Mrs. Hall, George Bouhe and the deMohrenschildts, and all that group had pity for Marina and her child. None of us cared for Oswald because of his political philosophy, his criticism of the United States, his apparent lack of interest in anyone but himself and because of his treatment of Marina. Although the men were sometimes skeptical about helping them out, the ladies were quite compassionate about Marina and felt that she needed help not only because of their straitened financial circumstances, but because of Oswald's mistreatment of her.
29. I recall that when I saw the newspaper item in the Fort Worth paper about Oswald returning from Russia with his Russian wife, I spoke to Max Clark and his wife. They are good friends and fine people, and he is a lawyer. We were all apprehensive about coming in contact with the Oswalds but all the friends of mine later expressed the view that the Federal Bureau of Investigation knew Oswald and Marina were coming into this country, and If they did not do anything about it, it was probably all right to have contact with them. I am afraid I never became completely reassured.
30. Marina never had any money, not even pennies. Oswald would not give any money to her. Consequently, when she lived with Mrs. Hall and later with the others she and her baby were utterly-dependent upon their host. She could not buy even a package of cigarettes, and even had she wished, she could not tender any token to her hosts.
Signed this 16th day of June 1964.
( S ) Alexander Kleinlerer,
ALEXANDER, KLEINLERER

----------

Mrs. Donald Gibson

Testimony of Mrs. Donald Gibson

The testimony of Mrs. Donald Gibson was taken at 11 a.m., on May 28, 1964, at 200 Maryland Avenue NE., Washington, D.C., by Mr. Albert E. Jenner, Jr., assistant counsel, and Richard M. Mosk, member of the staff of the President's Commission.
Mr. Jenner.
Would you be sworn?
Mrs. Gibson, in the testimony you are about to give on your deposition do you swear to tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth?
Mrs. Gibson.
I do.
Mr. Jenner.
Be seated, please. You are Mrs. Donald Gibson?
Mrs. Gibson.
Yes.
Mr. Jenner.
You are the former Alexandra De Mohrenschildt?
Mrs. Gibson.
Yes.
Mr. Jenner.
And you were at one time married to Mr. Gary Taylor, of Dallas, Tex.?
Mrs. Gibson.
Yes.
Mr. Jenner.
You now live in Wingdale, N.Y.?
Mrs. Gibson.
Yes.
Mr. Jenner.
What is your address in Wingdale?
Mrs. Gibson.
Harlem Valley State Hospital, Building 28, Wingdale, N.Y.
Mr. Jenner.
I take it you are employed at the hospital?
Mrs. Gibson.
Yes.
Mr. Jenner.
That is a State mental institution?
Mrs. Gibson.
Yes.
Mr. Jenner.
Is your husband also employed there?
Mrs. Gibson.
Yes.
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